Covid-19 spurs over-60s to consider later-life care

Covid-19 spurs over-60s to consider later-life care

The Covid-19 pandemic has meant we’ve evaluated many areas of our lives and priorities. One area that’s now being reconsidered by the over-60s is their later life care plan.

Research suggests that the challenges and restrictions care homes faced during lockdown mean people are keen to explore the alternatives. With many care home residents being vulnerable to illness and the proximity to others, they faced higher infection rates. This sadly led to death and serious illness in some cases, with loved ones unable to visit to offer comfort.

On top of this, care homes stopped permitting visitors, in line with social distancing guidelines, which had an impact on the quality of life and relationships for residents.

As a result, it’s not surprising that one million over-60s that had originally planned to go into care homes later in life if needed, are now rethinking their plans due to growing concerns from family members. Nearly a fifth (19%) of Brits who would have previously been open to care homes as an option for family members, now wouldn’t consider it.

What are the alternative options?

Moving into an assisted living facility, which offers more independence than a care home, or moving to a more manageable property are two of the most popular options. Around a fifth of Brits would choose each of these as their primary option. Others plan to rely on family for the additional support they may need later in life. One in ten would consider moving into a spare room at a loved one’s home while 6% would opt for a granny annexe.

Whether staying in their own home or moving in with family, respondents recognised the need for adaptation. Two thirds (67%) believe they need to alter properties in some way. The most popular home improvements include:

  • Making modifications to the bathroom (34%)
  • Installing an emergency alarm (27%)
  • Installing a chair lift (22%)
  • Buying new furniture, such as a bed with rails (22%)
  • Installing mobility features like ramps (19%)

The number of people recognising the need for such modifications shows over-60s aren’t shying away from the fact that more support may be needed in their later years. However, there is one important factor that many have failed to overlook, and that’s the associated costs.

Planning for the cost of later-life care

Worryingly, 55% of over-60s haven’t considered how they would fund later-life care or necessary adaptations. What’s more, a fifth (21%) expect to use their State Pension to cover these costs, but at £175.20 per week (£9,110.40 annually), it’s unlikely to stretch very far.

If you moved into a care home, you could expect significant outgoings. In 2019, the average cost of a residential care home was £33,852 per year, rising to £47,320 if nursing care was included.

Alternative options may be cheaper, but the costs still add up. An assisted living facility will come with ongoing charges for the care provided. If you were to remain in your home but required the support of a carer for two hours a day, you can expect to pay around £20 per hour. That may not seem like much but adds up to £14,560 per year.

Even if you remain in your home and don’t require additional support, necessary adaptations can take a sizeable chunk out of your savings or income. In England, council support may be available if adaptations cost less than £1,000 if it’s been deemed necessary. Further support is typically means-tested, so the costs could fall to you.

Despite the sums of money associated with later-life planning, the financial aspect remains overlooked. But it should be part of your wider financial plan.

As you think about what type of support you’d prefer later in life, it’s worth reviewing your finances and overall goals. Financial planning can help you understand how your assets can be used to provide you with security for the rest of your life, including where some form of care is needed.

It’s a process that can also create a safety net for when obstacles derail your plans. You may intend to move in with a family member but circumstances outside of your control mean it’s not an option when the time comes. With a financial plan that’s considered this in place, you can rest assured that other options are still available. It can also help you understand how the potential cost of care could affect other priorities, such as the income you take during early retirement or the legacy you leave behind for loved ones.

If you’d like to discuss your plans for funding later-life care, please get in touch. We’re here to help you create a blueprint that considers your wishes and give you peace of mind.

Please note: This blog is for general information only and does not constitute advice. The information is aimed at retail clients only.

5 steps that allow you to handle a financial crisis

5 steps that allow you to handle a financial crisis

Even with careful financial planning, shocks can happen. Often financial crises are unexpected and out of our control, so it’s important to have a safety net to fall back on. However, research suggests that most people don’t feel confident in their ability to overcome a financial crisis.

Whether it’s unexpected property maintenance or redundancy, it’s essential that you feel confident in your financial situation. Research from Aegon indicates this isn’t the case for millions of Brits though. It found just three in ten men and two in ten women are confident they could financially handle a major unexpected expense. Money worries emphasised this lack of confidence too. 76% of women and 72% of men admitted they worry about money.

If that sounds familiar, here are five steps you can take.

1. Keep track of your spending

It’s easy to lose track of where our money is going. But it’s a sure-fire way to miss opportunities that could save you money.

Keeping tabs on a household budget can highlight were direct debits, such as utility bills or phone contracts, have crept up. A regular review will help you find the best deals and reduce essential living costs. It can also highlight where discretionary spending is adding up. Small expenses often go unnoticed when you look at the bigger picture, but they can have an impact. If you’re worried about money because you feel you’re not saving enough, for instance, cutting back here can help.

2. Reduce high-interest debt

If you have existing high-interest debt, such as credit cards or loans, you should prioritise repaying these.

Interest rates on savings are at a historic low. As a result, money in your savings accounts is likely to be offering significantly less interest than the amount you’re paying to service the debt. Reducing debt first can mean your outgoings are eventually reduced, allowing you to divert more to savings in the future.

Not only does it make financial sense to pay off debt, but it can be a weight off your mind. People often find their financial wellbeing and their confidence improves when they are debt-free.

3. Build up a rainy-day fund

Having a financial safety net to fall back on can deliver more confidence too. It’s recommended that you keep three to six months’ expenses in an easy access savings account. This gives you a financial buffer should something happen.

It can seem like a large target if you’re starting from scratch. But you should make it part of your budget, transferring a set amount each month. As it gradually grows, you’ll hopefully start to feel more confident in your financial security.

4. Consider your long-term financial plan

Often when we worry about money, it’s the short term we focus on. However, looking ahead to the medium and long term is also important and can be a source of anxiety. Once you feel more confident in your current finances, turning your attention to goals further down the line is the next step.

This may include adding more to your pension, building up an investment portfolio or creating a nest egg for children or grandchildren. Knowing you’ve taken action to meet long-term aspirations can provide a confidence boost and help you feel more in control of your finances.

5. Seek financial advice

The research suggests employees would like additional financial support. 69% of women and 65% of men would find face-to-face financial advice useful, as it allows them to address specific concerns. Even if your workplace doesn’t offer these types of benefits, it is possible to get the type of support you could benefit from.

Some services can offer guidance on a range of financial wellbeing issues, from debt management to your options at retirement. Seeking financial advice can also help you create a holistic financial plan that addresses your concerns, goals and long-term ambitions. It’s a process that can give you confidence in your ability to weather the unexpected, including financial shocks. To discuss your needs, please get in touch.

Please note: This blog is for general information only and does not constitute advice. The information is aimed at retail clients only.

5 ways the Chancellor could recoup the cost of Covid-19

5 ways the Chancellor could recoup the cost of Covid-19

While the health concerns of the Covid-19 pandemic remain, some of the focus is now shifting to the economic impact. Measures taken to reduce the spread of infection and save jobs have cost the government a huge amount that will need to be recouped in some way.

The final Covid-19 bill is impossible to estimate, we don’t know how things will change over the coming months. However, the Office for Budget Responsibility estimates the cost for the current tax year is likely to be more than £300 billion. The government was expecting to borrow around £55 billion for the whole of 2020/21. But in the first two months of the tax year alone, it has borrowed £100 billion to cover the costs of the scheme implemented due to the pandemic.

Chancellor Rishi Sunak was appointed Chancellor in February this year. He’s already delivered a delayed Budget in March, as the pandemic was starting to take hold in the UK, followed by the Summer Statement in July. Both have focused on protecting people and the economy as Covid-19 spread. As the Autumn Budget is now approaching, his attention may be turning to how some of the costs can be recovered.

While nothing has been formally announced yet, speculation is mounting that some allowances will be reduced, some of which may affect you.

1. Capital Gains Tax

Speculation that changes to Capital Gains Tax (CGT) will come in are rife after the Chancellor commissioned The Office of Tax Simplification to investigate if it’s “fit for purpose”. Compared to previous levels of CGT, the current rates are relatively low. This provides plenty of scope for allowances to be reduced or rates to rise.

CGT is paid on the profit when you sell certain assets. This may include a property that isn’t your main home, personal possessions worth more than £6,000 (excluding your car), investments not held in an ISA, and business assets.

Individuals have an annual exemption of £12,300 per tax year. Profit beyond this allowance is taxed. Basic rate taxpayers have a CGT rate of 10%, this rises to 20% for higher and additional rate taxpayers. Where the profit is made on property, an additional 8% tax is added for all Income Tax bands.

2. Pension tax relief

A change in pension tax relief hasn’t been mentioned by Rishi Sunak yet. However, his predecessor Sajid Javid has called on the government to reduce the amount of tax relief paid to high earners. It could now be something the current Chancellor is exploring too.

Assuming you don’t exceed your annual pension allowance, you receive tax relief at the highest level of Income Tax you pay. As a result, higher and additional rate taxpayers receive far more through this incentive. The Pensions Policy Institute found workers earning less than £50,000 made up 83% of taxpayers, but they received less than a quarter of pension tax relief paid.

A change to pension tax relief is likely to make it ‘fairer’ by offering a flat-rate tax relief for all pension savers.

3. Pension triple lock

The pension triple lock guarantees that the State Pension will rise every year in line with either inflation, average wage growth or a minimum of 2.5%. It helps to protect spending power among pensioners. Maintaining the triple lock was a manifesto pledge, but some signs are pointing towards changes in the future.

The Chancellor told the Treasury Committee that it would be appropriate for the government to look at the triple lock at the “right time”. There are concerns that a spike in wages would make the guarantee to pensioners unaffordable in the coming years.

4. Pension tax-free lump sum

Currently, when you access your pension, which is available from the age of 55, you can withdraw 25% of the money tax-free. Any further withdrawals are subject to Income Tax, the same way your salary or other sources of income may be.

The tax-free lump sum has proved a popular option among retirees and it’s a decision that’s likely to be unpopular with those approaching their retirement date. Reducing the tax-free lump sum to 20% could add £1.8 billion of extra revenue, the IFS has suggested, making it an attractive option for the Chancellor.

5. Inheritance Tax

Again, any changes to Inheritance Tax rules would prove unpopular but there have been growing calls to reform the system to make it fairer and simpler.

At the moment, individuals can take advantage of two allowances when leaving wealth to loved ones. The nil-rate band is currently £325,000, with no Inheritance Tax due if your estate is below this figure. Those passing on their main home to children or grandchildren can also use the residence nil-rate band, currently set at £175,000. Unused allowance can be passed on to a surviving spouse or civil partner. In effect, this means couples can leave up to £1 million without worrying about Inheritance Tax.

Reducing the allowances or scrapping the additional residence nil-rate band could help raise tax revenue.

Rishi Sunak has some decisions to face before the Autumn Budget, and it’s likely some allowances will be affected. It may be appropriate to change plans when these are announced, but you shouldn’t act on speculation. If or when things change, we’ll be here to help you.

Please note: This blog is for general information only and does not constitute advice. The information is aimed at retail clients only.

Please do not act based on anything you might have read in this article. All contents are based on our understanding of HMRC legislation which is subject to change.

Retirement planning as a couple: Balancing different goals

Retirement planning as a couple: Balancing different goals

Planning for retirement should be an exciting time in your life. You’re able to give up work and focus on the things you enjoy. But what if your aspirations and financial expectations don’t line up with your partner’s? Creating a balance can help both of you feel fulfilled in the next stage of your life.

It’s not uncommon to find that partners have conflicting views of what they want retirement to look like. While you’re both working, you may have discussed ensuring you have enough saved or even talked about some of the things you’d like to do. However, most of us don’t start considering retirement in great detail until the milestone isn’t too far off. Discussing your plans can help make sure you’re both on the same page as you move forward.

Before you start the conversation, it’s worth both of you separately thinking about the retirement lifestyle you’d like:

  • Are there any ‘big ticket’ experiences you’d like to do?
  • What would your ideal day-to-day lifestyle look like?
  • What are your priorities for retirement?

Understanding what you’d like, can help you identify shared aspirations and where you need to strike a balance between two views. Often when we first think of retirement, it’s the experiences we want in the initial years after giving up work that is the focus, such as travelling or helping to raise grandchildren, but your daily routine as you settle into retirement is just as important.

Understanding retirement finances

While couples may often discuss household expenditure, the same can’t be said for retirement finances. In fact, 24% of couples have never discussed their retirement income. It can mean you have widely different expectations for your income and approach to managing money as you enter retirement.

As with lifestyle goals, discussing what you want is important.

The first step should be to understand what income and assets you expect to have to fund retirement. This may include the State Pension, Final Salary pensions, Defined Contribution pensions, savings, investments, and property.

But understanding assets isn’t the only thing you need to do; you also need to understand how both of you approach retirement finances:

  • What assets will create your base income?
  • How would you create a financial safety net to cover the unexpected?
  • What level of income do you need for the day-to-day lifestyle you want?
  • How do you feel about investment risk as you enter retirement?
  • What kind of legacy would you like to leave behind for loved ones?

The answers to these types of questions will be linked to the lifestyle you want to achieve. However, they can highlight the differences in how you view money, even if it’s something you’ve agreed on before. In the past, you may have been happy investing in mid-risk funds to grow your wealth but in retirement prefer stability and financial security. Your partner, on the other hand, may be keen to increase investment risk as outgoings reduce and you have a base income for essentials. Looking at financial views now can help you strike a balance and understand the short and long-term impact of the options.

How financial planning can help

Financial planning can ensure your goals and finances align. But the process can also help you understand what your priorities are too.

A key part of financial planning is talking to clients to set out goals, lifestyle aspirations and more. We ask what it is you want your savings to do for you. It’s a chance to think about what is most important as you start planning for retirement. Having an outside perspective go through your retirement plan can help you see what your priorities are.

Where retirement goals don’t match up perfectly, there are often solutions that can ensure both of you are happy and confident as you give up work. Getting your finances in order can give you the freedom to do more without having to worry about the uncertainty of the long term. If you’d like to start your retirement planning with us, please get in touch.

Please note: This blog is for general information only and does not constitute advice. The information is aimed at retail clients only.

A pension is a long-term investment. The fund value may fluctuate and can go down, which would have an impact on the level of pension benefits available. Your pension income could also be affected by the interest rates at the time you take your benefits.

The tax implications of pension withdrawals will be based on your individual circumstances, tax legislation and regulation which are subject to change.

How does group insurance work?

How does group insurance work?

Whether you’re an employer that is considering offering group insurance to employees or a worker that benefits from group cover, it’s important to understand what it is, how it provides security and when it can be used.

Group Life Insurance is a popular benefit that’s usually offered by employers. It acts in a similar way to a Life Insurance policy, which an individual takes out. In the case of Life Insurance, the individual will pay regular premiums and should they die during the term of the policy, their loved ones will receive a lump sum. It’s a step that can provide peace of mind that your family will be taken care of financially should the worst happen.

As the name suggests, group insurance covers a group of people rather than just one and the ongoing premiums are usually paid in full by the employer. It’s a benefit that’s sometimes referred to as ‘death-in-service’ as rather than a fixed-term, employees will typically be covered while they remain employed with the company.

What would group insurance cover?

First, it’s important to note that group insurance policies can vary.

If you’re currently covered by a group insurance policy, you should review your employee handbook or talk to your employer to fully understand what’s covered. If you’re thinking about putting group cover in place at your business, there are different options to consider and weigh up how they’d suit your employees.

Typically, a group insurance policy will pay out if you die while employed, to either your family or a nominated beneficiary. The benefit amount is often linked to the employee’s income, such as two or four times their annual salary. So, an employee earning £40,000 with group insurance equivalent to four-times their annual salary would leave their loved ones a £160,000 lump sum if they were to pass away whilst employed with the firm.

This lump sum is usually paid free of Income and Capital Gains Tax. They also may be written into a trust, which will ensure the sum is considered outside of your estate for Inheritance Tax purposes. However, this isn’t always the case.

In some cases, group insurance provided by an employer may be extended to cover your spouse or civil partner and provide other benefits, such as bereavement counselling to loved ones. Again, this isn’t guaranteed for all group insurance policies so you should check your policy first.

The lump sum loved ones receive can help provide financial security while they grieve. It could, for example, be used to pay off an existing mortgage debt or ensure children’s school fees will continue to be paid even as household income is reduced or stops.

There are benefits to group insurance whether you’re an employer or employee.

Benefits of group insurance for employees

The key benefit of group insurance is knowing that your loved ones will be financially secure should something happen to you, without having to set up your own policy. However, it’s worth assessing if the policy offered by your employer would be enough and if other individual policies should support it.

Depending on your loved ones and plans, you may find that further Life Insurance is needed to cover the expenses they would face, such as the mortgage. However, with group insurance covering part of the necessary sum, the policy you take out can be for a smaller amount, lowering premiums. It’s also an opportunity to think about if you and loved ones would benefit from potential extras some policies offer.

While considering Life Insurance, you should also take the time to assess other forms of financial protection. This includes Income Protection, which would pay out regular amounts if you’re unable to work due to illness or injury, and Critical Illness Cover, which would pay a lump sum on the diagnosis of a specified critical illness.

You may not need all types of financial protection, for example, if an employer has a strong sick pay package, Income Protection may not suit you. However, understanding how these policies have the potential to provide security can help you choose the most appropriate ones.

The benefit of group cover for employers

As an employer, group insurance can form part of your benefits package to attract and retain key members of staff. During the recruitment process, it’s a benefit that can make your firm more attractive than competitors as a place to work. It’s a benefit that can help drive your business forward.

Group cover can supplement other benefits you may offer employees, such as a competitive pension scheme or sick pay policy. Taking steps to ensure that your employees’ loved ones would be taken care of should they die in service can help ensure employees know they’re valued and the company does the ‘right thing’. Although the scenario of an employee dying is rare, it can happen. By taking out group insurance now, you know that should something happen, the processes and support are already in place.

In addition, the premiums paid for the group insurance usually qualify as an allowable business expense for Corporation Tax purposes.

If you’d like to discuss group insurance, whether as an employee or employer, please get in touch.

Using your assets to create flexibility with a Final Salary pension

Using your assets to create flexibility with a Final Salary pension

Pensioners transferring out of their Final Salary pensions, also known as Defined Benefit pensions, have made headlines recently as retirees seek more flexibility. But using other assets to create a flexible income throughout retirement can mean security and the ability to create an adjustable income to suit retirement plans.

Final Salary pensions are often referred to as ‘gold plated’ as they provide retirees with security. The amount you’ll receive at retirement and the age at which you’ll receive it are pre-defined when you become a member. This is usually dependent on the number of years you’ve been a member and either your final salary or a career average. The pension you receive isn’t linked to investment performance, it’s a guaranteed income for life.

While this is valuable, retirement lifestyles have changed enormously over the last few decades. Today, many retirees want a flexible income to suit their lifestyle, where income needs may change significantly over time. As a result, some retirees have chosen to transfer out of a Final Salary pension in return for a lump sum that can then be deposited in a Defined Contribution pension scheme, which can be accessed flexibly. However, this isn’t in the best interests of most people.

The benefits of a Final Salary pension

The key benefit of a Final Salary pension is the level of security it offers. You don’t have to worry about investment performance or ensuring pension withdrawals are sustainable. You know that you’ll have a regular income for the rest of your life.

What’s more, many Final Salary pensions have auxiliary benefits too. This could include paying a pension to a spouse or dependent should you pass away. Depending on your personal situation, these can be valuable in providing peace of mind and play an important role in your overall financial plan.

While a Final Salary pension does provide security, you may also want income flexibility in retirement. Assessing and using your other assets means you may be able to have the best of both worlds. Three options for creating flexibility with a Final Salary pension are:

1. Defined Contribution pensions

First, you may also hold a Defined Contribution pension. These types of pensions are more common than Final Salary pensions and if you’ve worked for several companies, you may have a mix of Final Salary and Defined Contribution Pensions.

With a Defined Contribution pension your contributions, along with employer contributions and tax relief, are added to a pension pot which is then invested. The value of the pension is dependent on contributions and investment performance. Once you reach age 55, this pension becomes available to access in a range of ways, including taking a flexible income as and when you need it.

Using a Defined Contribution pension to supplement the income of a Final Salary pension when you need it can create flexibility without having to sacrifice security. One thing to keep in mind with a Defined Contribution pension is that you’re responsible for deciding how it’s invested and that withdrawals are sustainable with your plans in mind. Having a regular income through a Final Salary pension can relieve some of this pressure but it’s still important to assess how you’re using pension savings.

2. Depleting savings

After decades of diligently saving, some retirees are reluctant to start depleting their savings, even if providing financial freedom in retirement has been what they are saving for.

It’s natural to worry about accessing savings. You may be concerned that you don’t have enough or that an unexpected expense will need to be covered. Having a strong financial plan in place can help put your mind at ease here. Using a range of tools, including cashflow planning, we can show you how your wealth will change over time, including if you begin to access your savings to add to your Final Salary pension income at certain points in retirement.

3. Using investments

Finally, investments held outside of a pension can also provide a useful boost to your retirement income when you need it. These may be investments that are held within an ISA or an investment portfolio.

Selling investments can provide you with a cash injection when you want it, for example, if you’re planning a once in a lifetime experience or big-ticket purchase that your typical Final Salary income wouldn’t cover. As with savings, it’s important to understand how accessing your investments at different points in retirement will affect your wealth and financial security to provide peace of mind.

Please contact us if you have a Final Salary pension and want to understand how it can fit into your retirement plans. By looking at your lifestyle goals and priorities during retirement, we can help you create a plan that matches your aspirations, including creating income flexibility where needed.

Please note: The value of your investment can go down as well as up and you may not get back the full amount you invested. Past performance is not a reliable indicator of future performance.

Transferring out of a Defined Benefit pension is not in the best interest of the majority of pension savers.

A Defined Contribution pension is a long-term investment. The fund value may fluctuate and can go down, which would have an impact on the level of pension benefits available. Your pension income will also be affected by the interest rate at the time you take your benefits.

The tax implications of pension withdrawals will be based on your individual circumstances, tax legislation and regulations which are subject to change in the future.